Why did you join the CBYA?

The opportunity to learn to sail nice yachts! Yes please? My waypoints to the CBYA included canoeing, Enterprises, Junks, windsurfers, metal assault boats, RIBs, and a lifetime passion for scuba diving.

What was a memorable first experience of the CBYA?

Leaving Moraira Marina at midnight as part of a fleet to sail to St Eulalia in Ibiza where we enjoyed wonderful hospitality and made real friends with local Spanish crews. It is possible that TrickyD was the last yacht to arrive (on more than one occasion), but we definitely did not resort to using the engine.

 What was your role and how did it change over the years?

As a club official at the time, my name is on the original  official documentation for the CBYA.  As Social Secretary, we tried a few different events e.g. Last Night of the Proms party with everyone and everything red, white and blue, and with live transmission from the Royal Albert Hall. A novel Walking Quiz around Javea Port area was a success, which can be repeated when Covid permits. The current large membership justifies a Social Team, and we are very lucky to have such volunteers.

What achievement are you most proud of?

Two really. Years of honing lifesaving skills came into serious use on a raft up in Granadella Bay. The second being the start of the Les Bassetes Days. As well as the Hobie Cats, the first day included canoeing, windsurfing and snorkelling all with expert guidance. The Hobie Cats are now a firm favourite in the CBYA calendar.

Give us an amusing anecdote.

Marking 200 years since the Battle of Trafalgar, the U.K. sail training tall ship Stavros S Niarchos had a programme of sails and courtesy visits to Spanish waters. Extremely short handed for a 200 ft brigantine, the Captain called for volunteers at only £99 for 8 days! Signing on in Gibraltar, Mary Saunders, Sandra Soper and I had to prove we could scale 100 ft up rope ladders, use the double harnesses to transfer to the booms and gather in heavy canvas sails even when out over the water. There were about 200 ropes on individual pins, on both sides – all unmarked. After a week of “2 – 6 heave, 2 – 6 heave” we sure knew every rope!

It was a ‘dry’ voyage so you can imagine our pleasure hearing the announcement  that we could buy alcohol on the BBQ night. Expecting plenty of younger crew buying beers, the Purser was completely taken aback to find first in the queue were us three asking for a bottle of wine each. Then he realised Oh yes, The Ladies of Spain”!

What are your hopes for the future of the CBYA?

The CBYA members have enjoyed two America’s Cups based in Valencia, three Volvo Ocean Races starting from Alicante, a multinational fleet of Tall Ships gathering in Alicante for a Round-the-Med trip. Currently Richard, Amanda, Victor, Steve and I are aboard TrickyD in Corfu, the turnaround marina for our Denia/Ionian Islands/Denia two month trip. Its a treat to see my old laser and cat being recycled at the CBYA El Portet Dinghy Days. All examples of the CBYA growth and diversification giving so many sailing opportunities to its members. Did Ron ever imagine his original idea would be so successful?

LONG MAY IT CONTINUE!!

Many thanks Diana – what an amzingly, active life you have led!